News - June 29, 2015

Glastonbury 2015: Five Things We Learned
by James
James
by James hmv London, Bio "Like the legend of the Phoenix, I've just eaten a whole packet of chocolate HobNobs..." Editor, hmv.com

Glastonbury 2015: Five Things We Learned

As the music industry and hordes of broken festivalgoers struggle to put themselves back together this morning, we gaze back through bloodshot eyes at the goings on this weekend at Worthy Farm, property of Michael and Emily Eavis and home, of course, to the legendary Glastonbury festival.

So, for those who couldn't make it - or those who were to wasted to remember anything - here's our round-up of the key highlights at Glastonbury 2015...

 

There's never a dull moment with Kanye West...

That probably goes without saying anyway, but so it proved once again with Kanye's headline slot at Worthy Farm on Saturday night. In an eventful two-hour set that was preceded with a BBC warning to “expect bad language”, Kanye blasted his way through a career retrospective set that saw him invite Bon Iver onto the stage to perform with him and also included a brief rendition of Queen's 'Bohemian Rhapsody'.

Kanye delivered a typically bombastic performance but was almost upstaged on a couple of occasions, firstly by the BBC's comedic subtitling, whose interpretations of Kanye's lyrics included some choice expletive-avoiding phrases like “All Day, Ligga” and “Motherducker”, screenshots of which were soon doing the rounds on Twitter. The other distraction came courtesy of a stage invasion by comedian Lee Nelson, who crept onto the stage mid-performance wearing a t-shirt emblazoned with the words “Lee-Zus” before he was swiftly bundled through the stage exit by some angry-looking security guards.

Kanye's appearance at Glastonbury may have been a controversial booking for the purists, but you can't argue with the entertainment value on offer here.

 


The Who still know how to close a show

They might be celebrating 50 years in the business, but Pete Townshend and Roger Daltry still know how to move a crowd. They also had a few words to say about Kanye's claim to be the world's “greatest living rock star”, with the veteran guitarist drawing cheers from the audience as he asked at the close of a belting 'Won't Get Fooled Again': “Who's the biggest rock star in the world?!”

 


Florence stepped up to the plate

Foo Fighters fans will be difficult to console following the disappointing cancellation of the band's appearance due to Dave Grohl's injury, but the organisers had no hesitation in moving Florence up the bill, and her band did not disappoint. Florence's bellowing vocals lit up the night and some barnstorming performances of new tracks like 'What Kind Of Man' show that Flo is getting better and better as a live performer.

 

Everybody sang 'Happy Birthday' to the Dalai Lama

Fresh from his speaking engagements in the serene Green Fields, the Dalai Lama was invited up onto the stage by veteran punk poet Patti Smith, who encouraged the thousands-strong crowd to sing 'Happy Birthday' to the Tibetan icon. He gave a speech to the crowd about happiness and teed up a packed perfromance from Lionel Richie, who reportedly drew the biggest audience of the weekend.

 

Chemical Brothers are still up there with the best live acts on the planet

For those who headed to The Other Stage to watch dancefloor gurus the Chemical Brothers as a closer to the weekend, they'll have been reminded that even after so many years in the game, the electronic duo's live sets are still as blisteringly vibrant as ever. Accompanied by some stunning visuals and spinning a set that included a career-spanning collection of their best tracks, the Chemicals closed the set with a pair of stone cold classics in 'Galvanize' and 'Block Rockin' Beats'. Aside from possibly Daft Punk, Tom and Eddy are still the world's best when it comes to sending a festival-sized crowd completely mental with heaps of pounding dance music.

 

You can relive the Glasto magic with abums from The Who, Florence + The Machine and all of this year's acts in-store or online here 

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