Other... - September 2, 2014

hmv.com presents… The Best Soundtracks Of All Time: Blade Runner
by Wil
Wil
by Wil hmv London, Bio .

hmv.com presents… The Best Soundtracks Of All Time: Blade Runner

With some great in-store offers coming this summer on film soundtracks as part our 'Decades' series, every day we'll be picking the best soundtrack, one for every year, starting with 1950 right through to the present day. Today we're up to 1982 and we're taking a look at Ridley Scott’s epic sci-fi noir Blade Runner.

 

What?

Blade Runner, the dark futuristic detective story based on Philip K Dick’s Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep.

 

Released When?

1982. 

 

So what’s the film about?

Los Angles, 2019. Deckard (Harrison Ford) is a ‘blade runner’, a sort of futuristic bounty hunters who tracks down rouge cyborg creations disguised as humans known as ‘replicants’.  He’s tasked with finding four replicants who have recently made their way to Earth illegally, led by would-be robot revolutionary Roy Batty (Rutger Hauer).

What follows is a complicated, paranoid tale that takes the tropes of detective fiction and weaves them into a stunning sci-fi world like nothing captured on-screen before. As Deckard follows Batty’s trail, he begins to realised that nobody can be trusted – not even himself.

 

Is this a score or a soundtrack?

A score, from the great Greek composer Vangelis.

 

So what’s it like?

It’s a highly unique score, combining traditional classical music and futuristic sounding synthesizers. It mixes cold, almost atonal synth sounds with retro elements, such a jazzy saxophone solo on “Love Theme” and the 30s influenced song “One More Kiss Dear”, which sounds like it could be playing off an old gramophone.

 

What does it give the film?

The whole score has an unsettling, inhuman feel, perfectly matching both the themes and the tone of the film. The cold robotic synths trying to recreate the sounds of the past is almost a metaphor for the replicants in the film, artificial life forms going around trying act like how they think humans would act. The icy cold music is also like the rain that constantly pours throughout the film.

 

What’s the best moment?

The epic “Blade Runner Blues”, a stunning eight minute-plus soundscape of synths, evoking the oppressive future Los Angeles that Ridley Scott so perfectly realised.

 

Has it stood the test of time?

The modern world hasn’t even caught up with Blade Runner yet – this is the sound of the future. You can download it here too. 

Blade Runner
Blade Runner Ridley Scott
Blade Runner 30th Anniversary Trailer

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