September 23, 2014

hmv.com presents… The Best Soundtracks of All Time: Rushmore
by Wil
Wil
by Wil hmv London, Bio .

hmv.com presents… The Best Soundtracks of All Time: Rushmore

With some great in-store offers starting this week on films and on film soundtracks as part our 'Decades' series, every day we'll be picking the best soundtrack, one for every year, starting with 1950 right through to the present day. Today we're up to 1999 and we're going back to school with the soundtrack to Rushmore.

What?

Rushmore, the breakthrough film from indie darling Wes Anderson.

Released When?

1999

So what’s the film about?

Precocious, pretentious 15-year Max Fischer (Jason Schwarzman) attends the elite Rushmore Academy in Houston. He’s founder of the astronomy society, president of the French club, vice president of the stamp & coin club, manager of the lacrosse team, captain of the debate club, represents Russia in the Model UN, and gets up to a host more extra-circular activities. He’s just not a very good student.

Herman Blume (Bill Murray) is a rich but bored industrialist. His marriage is stalling. His two sons, with who he is mostly disappointed, attend Rushmore, and that’s how he meets Max. Impressed by his moxy, Blume and Max become friends.

That is, until the arrival at Rushmore of young widowed new English teacher Rosemary Cross (Olivia Williams), who instantly steals both of their hearts. Obviously she can’t be with both of them (despite the fact that she doesn’t really want to be with either of them), so this means war…

Is this a score or a soundtrack?

Sort of both – it’s a collection of songs interspersed with bits of the score.

So who’s on it? Anyone I might know?

Wes Anderson originally planned to have the soundtrack completely made up of songs by The Kinks. That ultimately didn’t happen, and only one of their songs ended up in the final film, but it definitely set the tone for the soundtrack. Nearly all of the songs included are from around the late 60s, from rock and folk acts, and most of them British – including the Who, Cat Stevens and John Lennon.

The score is by former Devo singer Mark Mothersbaugh, and consists of some lovely twee acoustic guitar picking.

So which songs are on it? Did any of them become hits?

Despite featuring some big name artist, Anderson tends towards more obscure album tracks and rarities, instead of the hits that we all know.

What’s the best moment?

It’s a toss up between The Creations’ crunching ‘Making Time’ over the early montage listing Max’s many, many extra-circular activities, or The Faces’ lovely ‘Ooh La La’ which Max and Rosemary dance to over the end credits.

Has it stood the test of time?

Like everything Wes Anderson puts his hands to, it is incredibly twee. But it’s also absolutely delightful. Everyone was a pretentious teenager once.

Rushmore - Trailer

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