My Record Collection - April 16, 2018

My Record Collection by Old Crow Medicine Show's Ketch Secor
by Tom
Tom
by Tom hmv London, Bio hmv.com Editor. Peanut butter, punk rock and pillows.

My Record Collection by Old Crow Medicine Show's Ketch Secor

In My Record Collection, we dig down to the bottom of musicians' souls to find out what the most treasured parts of their record collection are. This week, it's the turn of freewheeling folk collective Old Crow Medicine Show's Ketch Secor, whose duties in the band include fiddle, harmonica, banjo, guitar, bajo sexto and mandolin, let's see what he picks out...

 

The first record I ever bought with my own money was…

"Bad Brains' Quickness. I was 12 and they were supposed to be the hardest rock band in the world. The record store guy said if I didn’t like the cassette I could return it. I did not like it. And I did return it and the record store guy said, 'But I can’t resell it now that it’s open', 'But you said I could return it,' I complained. 'Fine, I guess I did say that,' he said. That’s how I got a free copy of Tracy Chapman's Crossroads which I loved, could sing you every song on that tape I loved it so much."

 

The record that made me want to be in a band was…

"Live From Newport Broadside, 1962 on Vanguard. That record had a dozen reasons why I should get into the music business. Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Tom Paxton, Jim Garland, but most of all it was the Freedom Singers and their song 'Black Dog, White Dog', that sealed my fate."

 

The record I've played more than any other is…

"Bob Dylan's Infidels. I got it for Christmas in 1989. Went to see Bob that spring. Sat through a 70-minute show and only understood 4 words. But they were powerful words. They were “hey” and “mister” and “tambourine” and “man” and that was all I needed to hear."

 

The record that always makes me feel good is…

"Pata Pata by Miriam Makeba. The joyous music that South Africans created in the middle of Apartheid is enough to turn anyone away from the cliff’s edge. Music is survival."

 

The record I turn to when I'm feeling down is…

"Pete Seeger's Abiyoyo. Children’s music for the child in all of us. I’d like to duct tape the president to a chair and make him listen to this record 30 times every day for the next 2 ¾ years."

 

The record I think is the most underrated of all time is…

“I'd say Viva Terlingua from Jerry Jeff Walker. C’mon you know you love Jerry Jeff. Why won’t you acknowledge him alongside the other pioneers of country music’s Outlaw movement?"

 

The record with my favourite cover art is…

"The Indestructible Beat of Soweto. It’s that visor he‘s wearing. I used to have one just like it."

 

 

The record with my favourite title is…

"This is The Dead Milkmen's Beezelbubba. I think Metaphysical Graffiti was a far superior album, but Beezelbubba’s got it as far as nom de guerres go."

 

The record I can't understand why everybody loves is…

"For me, this is The Rolling Stones' Exile On Main Street. I’m saying this quietly so my hipster neighbours don’t hear, but loud enough for all the Little Walter and Hound Dog fans. Blues singers don’t have stylists."

 

The last record I bought was…

"Furaha Wenye Gita by George Mukabi. Kakamega County, Kenya never knew a better songwriter. Here’s one of his lyrics: "It isn’t a piece of cloth! A child isn’t like a piece of cloth that you’d borrow from just anyone...”

 

The record I'm most looking forward to hearing in 2018 is…

"I am most looking forward to hearing our new album Volunteer played on 650AM WSM. I love that AM radio crackle."

 

The greatest record of all time is…

“George Washington Johnson's The Whistling Coon. Have a listen to it sometime. Wax cylinders held up better than shellac so it sounds better than records made 40 years later. Born in Virginia in the last years of slavery time, George moved to the Bowery and whistled for tips on the streets of New York. This is the first record, really."

"The first moment suspended in time from which all American popular music forms stem, rock and roll, hip hop, country, jazz. It’s all in Whistling Coon. It was the biggest record of its time. George Washington Johnson died broke but free. They’ll never put him on the walk of fame, but I’m telling you: the first African-American recording artist belongs in the most hallowed halls."

 

Old Crow Medicine Show's new album Volunteer is released on Friday (April 20th) and is available to pre-order here. 

Volunteer
Volunteer Old Crow Medicine Show

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