My Record Collection - August 18, 2020

My Record Collection by Tim Bowness
by Tom
Tom
by Tom hmv London, Bio hmv.com Editor. Peanut butter, punk rock and pillows.

My Record Collection by Tim Bowness

In My Record Collection, we dig down to the bottom of musicians' souls to find out what the most treasured parts of their record collection are. This week, it's the turn of post-rocker Tim Bowness, let's see what he opts for...

 

The first record I ever bought with my own money was…

"I’m guessing it was The Best Of John Barry, or its cheaper MFP label equivalent The Geoff Love Orchestra’s Big Bond Movie Themes. The first music I ever loved was film music, and I particularly liked soundtracks by John Barry, Bernard Herrmann and Ennio Morricone."

 

The record that made me want to be in a band was…

"Peter Hammill’s Over and David Bowie’s Low were both uncompromising albums that meant a lot to me personally, and also gave me the confidence to pursue whatever it was I felt I should be doing musically."

 

The record I've played more than any other is…

"This is Hejira by Joni Mitchell. It’s possibly my favourite album by probably my favourite artist. On the surface, not much happens. Like a Dylan narrative epic, the arrangements and the vocal delivery seem similar throughout, but the detail in the lyrics and the restlessly inventive playing mean it’s an album that continues to deliver surprises."

 

The record that always makes me feel good is…

"Steve Reich’s Different Trains/Electric Counterpoint still thrills me whenever I hear it. I can get completely lost in Reich’s delirious musical patterns."

 

The record I turn to when I'm feeling down is…

"Nick Drake’s Pink Moon is both phenomenally sad and extremely calm and comforting."

 

The record I think is the most underrated of all time is…

"Lots of my favourite albums don’t appear in all-time best-of lists, so I’d include anything from Talk Talk’s Laughing Stock to Blue Nile’s A Walk Across The Rooftops, John Martyn’s One World to Kate Bush’s Aerial in a list of personal favourites that I consider to be incredibly underrated."

 

The record with my favourite cover art is…

"I love Peter Saville’s work for Joy Division and Factory Records, as well as covers by 23 Envelope, who did the visuals for the 4AD label’s releases, and Hipgnosis. I’m also a huge fan of the Blue Note and Impulse! label sleeves from the 1950s and 1960s. ECM Records and Peter Gabriel’s artwork has been consistently brilliant too."

"In terms of scale and unique design, Isaac Hayes Black Moses, The Velvet Underground & Nico, and ELP’s Brain Salad Surgery are fantastic covers. For today’s favourite, I’ll go with Alfreda Benge’s artwork for Robert Wyatt’s eccentric classic Ruth Is Stranger Than Richard."

 

 

The record with my favourite title is…

"It’s a toss-up between Miles Davis’s enigmatic yet apt In A Silent Way and Joni Mitchell’s poetic and suggestive The Hissing Of Summer Lawns."

 

The record I can't understand why everybody loves is…

"Although I really like the single 'Fool’s Gold' and think Ian Brown’s solo albums are frequently interesting, I’ve never fully understood the fuss surrounding The Stone Roses’ debut."

 

The last record I bought was…

"I still buy things regularly and still prefer physical to streaming, partly as I feel I give more of my time and attention to something I’ve bought, and partly because I’m very aware of how little money musicians get from streaming."

"Recent purchases include Nadine Shah’s Kitchen Sink, Thundercat’s It Is What It Is, Sparks’ A Steady Drip, Drip, Drip, Jack Hues’ Primitif and Roger and Brian Eno’s Mixing Colours. I’ve also bought back catalogue items including The Blue Nile’s High and Peter Gabriel’s Rated PG. I also finally got round to getting Kendrick Lamar’s landmark release To Pimp A Butterfly."

 

The record I'm most looking forward to hearing in 2020 is…

"2020’s already produced a number of new albums I’ve greatly enjoyed, but the album I’m most looking forward to hearing properly is the forthcoming reissue of Bobbie Gentry’s 1968 Country concept album, The Delta Sweetie. She has an incredible voice: Expressive, soulful and warm without being overstated."

 

The greatest record of all time is…

"The album I’ve played most over the last half-decade is David Bowie’s Blackstar. It’s musically inventive and profoundly moving. A great ending to a great career."

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